University of California and Georgia Tech (1929)

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There were two main changes in the 1928 college football season. According to 'The Rose Bowl', "forward-pass restrictions were made", and "the kicking team could not run after recovering a mishandled punt"

Here is the information from both teams before they played against each other.

Contents

University of California

University-of-California.jpg

By the end of the season, the California team was ranked as the second best collegiate team in the country. Many different publications announced this team as rising star. Some players in the team earned honorable mention on many newspapers, and they were "Roy Reigels, Stan Barr, Steve Bancroft, and Lee Eisan" <rref name="one"> The Rose Bowl, 1902-1929, California/Georgia Tech (1929) </ref> according to 'The Rose Bowl'. Before the game against Georgia Tech, the California team played the big game of 1928 ranking as one of the greatest game against Stanford. There were roughly 82,000 people jammed into Memorial Stadium to watch the game. The tie in this game (13-13) allowed the Bears to "remain undefeated in conference play and to become co-champions of the Pacific Coast Conference along with the University of Southern California" [1] according to 'The Rose Bowl'.





Georgia Institute of Technology

Georgia-tech-fb.jpg

In the 1928 football season, Georgia Tech was the number one in the nation. The team started season by defeating "the Virginia Military Institute 13-0, Tulane University 12-0, Notre Dame 12-0, the University of North Carolina 20-7, Oglethorpe University 32-7, and Vanderbuilt University 19-7" according to 'The Rose Bowl'. From these victories, Georgia Tech received many national and individual awards. This team was coached by William Alexander, who had become the coach after John Heisman. Well known good players from Georgia Tech team were: Lom, Phillips, Vince Maree, Joe Westbrook.

Coach Alexander

Short information about him is that he entered Georgia Tech in 1906 as a student, and according to 'The Rose Bowl', it took him "six years to graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering. John Heisman made him to be the varsity captain in 1908" [1] and in 1911 Alexander earned a letter from beating Auburn. Later, he became a coach of Golden Tornado in Georgia Tech.

The game between Georgia Tech and California

According to The Rowe Bowl, "a crowd of 66.404 fans had come to see the two best collegiate teams in the country play. Up in the National Broadcasting Company booth were three men: Bill Munday, Graham Carl Haverlin, and Haverlin." The exciting part of the game was when the Reigels from California moved towards his own team's goal line. He kept running even though the coaches and the teammates were screaming at him. The Broadcasting booth was in a confusion, and finally at the moment Reigels reached the goal line. His team's defense, Lom, caught him by the arm and spun him around so that his body would not be in the end zone. But Tech players piled on him that the ball was ruled dead at the one-yard line. "The ensuring play was even more dramatic that the Bears sent Lom into a punt formation standing at the back of the end zone. Tech's giant tackle Vince Maree and Joe Westbrook, left guard, broke through to block the kick. So the ball went straight up and Tech led 2-0" [1] according to 'The Rose Bowl'. California's coach Price complained that Maree had stepped out of bounds in order to rush in to block the kick, but the referee's decision was already made. However, from this happening, the California team began to lose control. Tech continually blocked good offense from the Bears and Thomason scored the first touchdown, which made Georgia Tech lead 8-0. The California team would not play better. "On fourth down, the Bears tried a tricky end around play: Phillips threw a long passed downfield; Eisan, reserve quarterback, got behind the Tech defenders and all that Phillips had to do was to throw the ball to him. But it turned out to be another bad break for the Bears as Eisen was about to catch the ball, he fell" [1] according to 'The Rose Bowl'. The game settled down to a punting contest, but the bears on the first play of the fourth quarter scored. Lom threw a perfect pass to Phillips in the end zone for the touchdown, and with Barr kicking, the game was ended 8-7. Therefore, Georgia Tech won.

After the Game

According to 'The Rose Bowl', Reigels became very famous that many girls sent him letters for proposing marriage. Many publications headline read "REIGELS' 60 YARD RUN TOWARDS THE WRONG GOAL HELPS GEORGIA TECH WIN ON COAST, 8-7." [1] Also, some movie companies offered him a good paying job. Reigels was elected captain of the California team in his senior year and got honored "on the Central Press' All-American second a center" [2] according to 'Engineering the New South'. There were some articles and complaints about Reigels' playing against Georgia Tech, but Coach Alexander refuted about Reigels 'famous move' (which is most likely to be criticized by some) in the game in public. He stated, "It was a tough break for him, but he's a battler if I ever saw one. Others might have given up in the second half, but he never gave up!" <rref name="one"> The Rose Bowl, 1902-1929, California/Georgia Tech (1929) </ref> according to 'The Rose Bowl'.



References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 The Rose Bowl, 1902-1929, California/Georgia Tech (1929)
  2. Engineering The New South, Georgia Tech, 1885-1985 Athletics, The Post-Sputnik Era
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