Roy Mundorff

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Coach Mundorff[1]

Roy Mundorff worked for Georgia Institute of Technology (GT) as the head basketball coach from 1925 to 1942. During this time, he also served as the assistant football coach, freshman baseball coach, and Assistant Professor of Mathematics[2]. In 1938, his basketball team won the Southeastern Conference (SEC) Championship. He became Assistant Athletic Director in 1946 and head of the Department of Physical Training (PT) in 1950[3]. In 1952, Roy Mundorff left Georgia Tech to fill the position of Athletic Director at the University of Louisville, Kentucky[4].


Contents

Background

Roy Mundorff was born on February 20, 1902 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania[5]. He first attended Pennsylvania College of Gettysburg before enrolling at the University of Pennsylvania[6]. When he entered the University of Pennsylvania, he was planning on majoring in pre-law[7]. As he became more interested in mathematics, he put aside his pre-law plans and changed his major accordingly. During his college years, while pursuing mathematics, he engaged in sports, such as basketball, football, and baseball. He also participated in the baseball organization called Sparrows' Point Shipyard League. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania in 1921, he began his career at Richmond High School, Indiana, as a coach for all sports[8].

Coaching career at Georgia Tech

Roy Mundorff was hired by Georgia Tech’s Athletic Director Coach Alexander to be the freshman basketball coach in 1922. He continued coaching the freshman team for three years. In 1925, Roy Mundorff was promoted to the position of head varsity basketball coach. During that time, he served as an assistant coach in football and as a freshman baseball coach. Not only did he coach, but he also taught mathematics under the name of Dr. D. M. Smith. In 1934, he became president of the National Association of Basketball Coaches[9]. In March of 1934, he gave Georgia Tech and Atlanta the honor of hosting the first meeting of the association ever held outside the cities of New York and Chicago[10]. While he was coaching B-team football in 1935, he presented the idea of using movie cameras to study football to his fellow football coaches and players at Georgia Tech. His idea was adopted and used widely on the football field[11]. He remained as GT basketball coach until 1942. His basketball teams did well considering the fact that players did not receive basketball scholarships from Georgia Tech at the time[12].

1937 Southeastern Conference Tournament

Coach Mundorff opened the 1937 season with 15 straight victories and ended it with only one loss. After defeating 14 other basketball teams, Mundorff’s team went to the quarter-finals of the SEC tournament, where his team played against Mississippi State. His team took an early lead and finished the first half with a score of 26 to 17. When time ran out, his team ended up on top by beating Mississippi State with a score of 24 to 18. Until then, his team seemed unbeatable after winning 15 games straight. However, his team fell to the University og Kentucky on February 27th in the semi-finals. His team took an early lead again against Kentucky, but the Kentucky team put up a good fight and defeated them 30 to 40. Mundorff’s team lost for the first and the last time to the Kentucky team, who won the 1937 SEC Championship title[13].

1937 Season's Record[14]

School Score School Score
GT 53 Mercer 36
GT 35 Florida 25
GT 39 Vanderbilt 27
GT 51 Clemson 13
GT 54 Sewanee 32
GT 70 Ft.Benning 26
GT 34 Georgia 20
GT 30 Pennsylvania 31
GT 36 Sewanee 18
GT 42 Auburn 28
GT 40 Vanderbilt 30
GT 43 Florida 37
GT 42 Georgia 22
GT 35 Auburn 33
GT 43 Mississippi State 30
GT 30 Kentucky 40

1938 Southeastern Conference Championship

Coach Mundorff discussing plays with the team. Pictured left to right: Smith, Jordan, Johnston, Jones, and Sims[15]

Roy Mundorff’s basketball team emerged victorious in the Southeastern Conference Championship (SEC) in 1938. His team included the four lettermen from last year, Bo Johnston, Bill Jordan, Fletcher Sims, and Ed. Jones, Seniors Joe Ebdon and George Peffal, Juniors George Smith, Junior Anderson, and Dillard Munford, and Sophomore Walter Haymans. The four lettermen were aiming for the SEC Championship, since they lost to the Kentucky team in the semi-finals at the SEC Tournament of last year.

On January 8, Mundorff’s team encountered North Carolina State. In the first half his team was winning with the score of 24 to 10, but in the second half North Carolina State narrowed the score gap to two points. Eventually, Mundorff’s team prevailed with a score of 35 to 30. A week later, his team played the first two-game series against Vanderbilt. In the first game Georgia Tech won by a landslide, 59 to 25.

The second game was played on February 12 in Nashville, far away from their home ground. The opposition's cheers discouraged the GT team on the away court and Mundorff's team just narrowly achieved victory with a margin of 40 to 35. During the next two weeks, his team easily defeated Mercer University in the two-game series and the Crimson Tide of Alabama. They, also, beat the Bulldogs 51 to 28 at the Armory on January 29, and 29 to 27 in Athens on February 19.

On February 3, his team left Atlanta to play against Louisiana State University (L.S.U.) and Tulane. Four days later they were back in Atlanta, but they were dispirited over the two games that they lost by the scores of 35 to 47 and 22 to 37. The team regained confidence as they defeated South Carolina in a two-game series and Sewanee, Clemson, and Florida in one-game encounters.

The Auburn Plainsmen were more challenging in the two-game series, but Mundorff’s team won, 43 to 42 and 53 to 32. In the quarter finals of the SEC Tournament held in Baton Rouge, La, March 4, 5, and 6, his team faced Vandy. Due to the strong defense forged by Mundorff’s team, Vandy scored only 18 points while Jackets scored 51 points. The next day, in the semi-finals, the Jackets encountered and defeated Tulane 44 to 29. On the same night Mississippi Team beat L.S.U.

In the finals of a SEC Tournament, Mundorff’s team triumphed over Mississippi Team with the score of 44 to 31 and won the SEC Championship. Coach Roy Mundorff successfully finished the 1938 season with a record of 17 victories and two defeats and with the SEC Championship trophy[16] [17].

Navy career

On December, 1, 1941, Roy Mundorff was appointed as a Naval ROTC instructor at Georgia Tech. He established the V-12 units at Georgia Tech and Emory,and as a result he became commandant of Radar School at the University of Harvard. In January 1945, he was elevated to the position of acting commander of the whole Naval Training School at Harvard[18].

Return to Georgia Tech

Coach Roy Mundorff returned to Georgia Tech in 1946, and became Assistant Athletic Director, leaving behind his coaching duties. At Coach Alexander’s death on April 25, 1950, the Athletic Board had a meeting. Afterwards, Roy Mundoff was made head of the PT Department. He continued his position as Director of Intramural Program and Assistant Athletic Director, serving Bobby Dodd, the new Athletic Director[19].

Resignment

Coach Roy Mundorff resigned from his position as Assistant Athletic Director at Georgia Tech on December 31, 1951. On January 1, 1952, he moved to Louisville to assume his new role as Director of Athletics at the University of Louisville. As a goodbye message to the faculty and students of Georgia Tech, Coach Mundorff said, "It is with much regret that I leave Georgia Tech after 29 years of very pleasant relations with my associates. I have enjoyed to the utmost my activities with as fine a student body as I ever hope to be with. I have loved and always will be proud of my connections with Georgia Tech and leave it with a hope that I will not lose contact with the institution, its present and past students and a fine faculty that compose it"[20].

References

  1. The Technique, Volume 20, January 24,1941, Page 5.Retrieved 02 October, 2010
  2. The Technique, Volume 20, January 24,1941, Page 5.Retrieved 02 October, 2010
  3. The Technique, Volume 34, April 28,1950, Page 1.Retrieved 01 October, 2010
  4. The Technique, Volume 35, July 27,1951, Page 1.Retrieved 01 October, 2010
  5. The Technique, Volume 35, July 27,1951, Page 1.Retrieved 01 October, 2010
  6. The Technique, Volume 35, July 27,1951, Page 1.Retrieved 01 October, 2010
  7. The Technique, Volume 20, January 24,1941, Page 5.Retrieved 02 October, 2010
  8. The Technique, Volume 20, January 24,1941, Page 5.Retrieved 02 October, 2010
  9. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1934. Georgia Institute of Technology, Athletics 1934. Retrieved 14 October, 2010
  10. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1934. Georgia Institute of Technology, Athletics 1934. Retrieved 14 October, 2010
  11. The Technique, Volume 36, November 2,1951, Page 6.Retrieved 02 October, 2010
  12. The Technique, Volume 35, July 27,1951, Page 1.Retrieved 01 October, 2010
  13. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1937. Georgia Institute of Technology, part VII (Clubs & Winter Athletics). Retrieved 22 October, 2010
  14. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1937. Georgia Institute of Technology, part VII (Clubs & Winter Athletics). Retrieved 22 October, 2010
  15. The Technique, Volume 17, March 11, 1938, Page 5.Retrieved 02 October, 2010
  16. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1938. Georgia Institute of Technology, part VIII (Athletics)1948. Retrieved 02 October, 2010
  17. The Technique, Volume 17, March 11, 1938, Page 5.Retrieved 02 October, 2010
  18. The Technique, Volume 35, July 27,1951, Page 1.Retrieved 01 October, 2010
  19. The Technique, Volume 35, July 27,1951, Page 1.Retrieved 01 October, 2010
  20. The Technique, Volume 35, July 27,1951, Page 1.Retrieved 01 October, 2010
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