Marcus Nanotechnology Building

From Buzzpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Marcus Nanotechnology Building

A recent addition to Georgia Tech campus, the Marcus Nanotechnology Building located at UNIQ4605e931428cb857-geo-00000000-QINU, will emphasize the importance of this growing scientific field.

Contents

The Growth of an Industry

Nanotechnology deals with the observation and manipulation of matter on a molecular scale. [1] The field is relatively new and is growing at an exponential rate. It is the hope of Georgia Tech to capitalize on this growth. The new Nanotechnology Building joined with the nanotechnology facilities housed in the Pettit Microelectronics Building create an impressive node of specified studies and research. It is the hope of Georgia Tech President Dr G.P. 'Bud' Peterson that this expansion will promote the growth of related industries in the Atlanta area. Ultimately the expansion aims to position both the university and the surrounding urban area at the forefront of this new field.[2]

The Design of the Building

Architects

  • The Design Architect of the building was Bohlin Cywinski Jackson.
  • The Executive Architect was the M+W Group.[3]

Interior

Inside the Marcus Nanotechnology Building

The building houses a three-story, 30,000 square foot expanse of clean-room space in the, making it the largest clean-room area in the Southeastern United States. [4] Floor-plans for the building can be found at http://www.nrc.gatech.edu/?q=content/pettit-floor-plan






Exterior

Effects of Sunlight on the Building

The exterior of the building is covered by perforated copper plates. This perforation is meant to unite the interior and exterior spaces. These circular holes vary in depth to allow light into the rooms as the sun moves throughout the course of the day. At night, an LED lining he crease between the exterior wall and ceiling illuminates the back of the panels to create a pattern on the walls beneath the screens. Glass is also used extensively on the exterior of the building. This introduces an element of transparency in addition to the preexisting emphasis on natural light(as communicated by the perforated copper screen). The surrounding areas are also important to the design of the exterior. The building faces Ferst Drive, a main road on Georgia Tech's campus. The remain three sides border a street, the "Eco Commons" landscape, and a newly-constructed pedestrian path.[5]






Awards

  • 2010 Design of Honor Award

Society of American Registered Architects

  • 2010 Design Award, New Construction Category

North American Copper in Architecture Awards

  • 2009 Merit Award for Design

AIA Philadelphia

  • 2009 Special Award for Best Project Management

Southeast Construction Best of 2009 Awards

  • 2008 Silver Citation of Merit, Overall Interior South Region

CISCA Construction Excellence Award [6]

The Cost

In total, the building's construction came at a cost of 90 million dollars. Atlanta philanthropist Bernie Marcus, creator of the Marcus Foundation, was responsible for a 15 million dollar donation to the project. To acknowledge Marcus’s generosity, the new building carries his name. [7]

References

  1. Solutions for Advanced Manufacturing Glossary.Nanotechnology. Retrieved December 13, 2010 from http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/sam-sfp.nsf/eng/sa02103.html6
  2. Science Centric.Marcus Nanotechnology Building at Georgia Tech formally dedicated. Retrieved December 13, 2010 from http://www.sciencecentric.com/news/09042463-marcus-nanotechnology-building-at-georgia-tech-formally-dedicated.html
  3. Bohlin Cywinski Jackson.Marcus Nanotechnology Center Building. Retrieved December 13, 2010 from http://www.bcj.com/public/projects/project/86.html
  4. Georgia Tech Research News.The Next Big Thing: Georgia Breaks Ground for New Nanotechnology Building – and a Stake in a Future Industry. Retrieved December 13, 2010 from http://gtresearchnews.gatech.edu/newsrelease/nano-center.htm
  5. Bohlin Cywinski Jackson.Marcus Nanotechnology Center Building. Retrieved December 13, 2010 from http://www.bcj.com/public/projects/project/86.html
  6. Bohlin Cywinski Jackson.Marcus Nanotechnology Center Building. Retrieved December 13, 2010 from http://www.bcj.com/public/projects/project/86.html
  7. Bohlin Cywinski Jackson.Marcus Nanotechnology Center Building. Retrieved December 13, 2010 from http://www.bcj.com/public/projects/project/86.html
Personal tools