Joe Pittard

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Coach Joe Pittard (1899-1972) was Georgia Tech's head baseball coach and assistant football coach for 16 years.
Coach Pittard in 1951[1]
He remade the Georgia Tech Baseball team, the Jacket Nine. He was apart of Georgia Tech's athletic staff for 29 years.[2]


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Before Tech

Julian Howard Pittard was born in Winterville, Georgia in 1899[3]. During his early childhood he acquired the nickname "Joe" which he was known by for the rest of his life[3]. Pittard enrolled in high school at Winterville, Georgia where he participated on his school's basketball, baseball, and track teams[3][4]. After he completed high school, Joe Pittard enrolled in Young Harris Junior College where he participated on his college football, baseball, and track teams[5].

During World War I, Joe Pittard enlisted in the military as a First Lieutenant. He was the athletic officer at Fort McPherson from 1917 to 1919[3] Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1948. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1948. p365, 394-398. Print./>. During his time at Fort McPherson he taught German prisoners baseball. Each German insisted that their personal guard dog should be allowed on the field. Pittard observed that the Germans could not grasp the concepts of a foul ball and that the dogs were more interested in playing fetch[5].

After he finished serving in the armed forces, Pittard enrolled into Vanderbilt College and then to the University of Georgia to complete his requirements for a teaching degree.[3] He became the athletic director and coach at Gainesville High school in Georgia where he stayed for fourteen years[3]. He coached the school's baseball, football, and track teams. His high school football team won the state championship in 1926 and had an overall record of 98 win, 13 loses, and 2 ties[3] [2]. His track team won a North Georgia Title and nine district crowns[2]. He resigned as the athletic director and coach at Gainesville High school to join Georgia Tech's coaching and athletic staff March 1, 1943[3].

Pittard career at Georgia Tech

In 1943 coach Joe Pittard was chosen by the Georgia Tech Director of Athletics, William Anderson Alexander, to replace Roy Mundorff as the head baseball coach.[2]

Coaching career at Georgia Tech

In 1944 he started to coach Georgia Tech's "B" Team in football along with the track and cross country team that year. [6] He continued to coach the "B" team in 1945. Coach Pittard recreated the Georgia Tech baseball team in 1946. The "Jacket Nine" was revived after three years of their absence.[5] In their first season, the "Jacket Nine" obtained a baseball record of 10 wins,2 loses, and no ties.[7] Coach Pittard continued to be the head coach of the Georgia Tech's base ball team and the assistant football coach for the "b" team from 1946-1961. He eventually gave up his acting position as a coach in 1961 after completing 16 season as Tech's baseball coach.[2]


1957 Southeastern Conference (SEC)

Georgia Tech's Jacket Nine 1957 SEC Champion team. [8]

In the year 1957, Coach Pittard's baseball team, the "Jacket Nine," became the Southeastern Conference Champions. His team consisted of Dick Gookin, Toppy Vann, Johnny Menger, Coach Joe Pittard, Ted Thomas, Lane Akers, Vince Terry, Bobby Dover, Gray Potter, Bob Stanley, Terry Randall, Bubba Brisbane, Jim Nelson, Robbie Neeley, manager Bernie Prager, Danny McGregor, Earl Moore, Bob Patton, Jack Jordan, Jimmy Towery, and Bud Blemker. Lane Akers was their team captain.

The first team the Jacket Nine played against in the SEC was the Florida Gators. In the SEC the Jacket Nine have to play three games against each opposing team. In the first game against Florida the Jacket Nine won with the score 12 to 1, the second game the Jacket Nine won with the score 10 to 1, and the last game they won with the score 8 to 2.

The next school the Jacket Nine played was Kentucky state. Coach Pittard's team won all three games with the scores of the games being 6 to 5, 13 to 4, and 9 to 7. The Jacket Nine advanced to play Tennessee state. Once again Coach Pittard's team won all the game in the series. The first game they won with the score 14 to 0, the second game they won with the score 7 to 2, and the last game of the series they won with the score 12 to 7.

To make it to the playoffs, the Georgia Tech's baseball Team needed to win 2 out of 3 games against their next opponent which was Auburn. The first game against Auburn resulted in Georgia Tech wining with the score 2 to 1. The second game of the series resulted with Georgia Tech losing with the score 2 to 3. Coach Pittard needed his team to win the last game in the series to be eligible to participate in the Southeastern Conference playoff. They did beat Auburn in the last game of the series with the score of 8 to 7. After they defeated Auburn the made it to the playoffs against Alabama.

To earn the Conference crown the Jacket Nine needed to win 2 games out of 3 against Alabama. In the first game they beat Alabama with the score of 5 to 4. Coach Pittard's team lost the second game with the score 10 to 11. The Jacket Nine needed to win the last game to be crown champions. They prevail in their last game, beating Alabama 10 to 1. The Jacket Nine became the Southeastern Conference champions. [8]

Baseball team's records

Coach Pittard coached Georgia Tech's baseball team for 16 seasons. This is a list of how many games the Jacket Nine in W-L-D (Win, Lose or Draw) format

  • In 1946: 10-2 [7], in 1947:7-6 [9], in 1948: 11-9[10], in 1949: 10-14[11], in 1950: 7-11[12], in 1951: 11-12 [1], in 1952: 8-11-1 [13], in 1953: 8-13 [14], in 1954: 9-13 [15], in 1955: 15-9 [16], in 1956: 11-12 [17], in 1957: 18-8-1[8], in 1958: 7-17[18], in 1959: 18-8-1 [19], in 1960: 14- 11[20] ,in 1961: 6-16-2[21]

Other activities

  • While coaching at Georgia Tech, Julian H. Pittard was also on the staff of the Physical Training Department as an assistant professor. [10] He help teach a two year course that is open to all students on campus. The goal of the course was to keep the student body fit and motivated. [13]
  • Even though he retired from Georgia Tech's coaching staff in 1961. He remained on Georgia Tech's athletic staff for the rest of his life.

Death and burial

Joe Pittard was hospitalized October 30, 1972 due to an abdominal ailment.[2] He died in the Piedmont Hospital at age 73 . [22] His funeral service was held at the First United Methodist Church in Atlanta [23], and he is buried in Greenwood Cemetery.[2]

Legacy

In his lifetime, coach Pittard worked in the athletic department for 52 years[2], touching the lives of everyone he encountered. In coach Joe Pittard's 16 years of coaching Georgia Tech's baseball team he compiled a total record of 169 win, 171 loses, and 7 ties.[22] His baseball team won the 1957 Southeastern Conference championship.[22] He was inducted into Helms College Baseball Hall of Fame in 1967[22] and the Georgia Tech's Athletic Hall of Fame in 1968.[24] He is also recognized in the State of Georgia Athletic Hall of fame which he was inducted in the year 1960.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1952. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1952. p200-03. Print.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 "Tech Loses a Great One." Atlanta Journal-Constitution 06 Dec 1972, Print.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 "Football, Baseball Coaching Demonstrate Pittard's Ability ." Technique 02 Jun 1950, Print.
  4. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1944. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1944. p210,221,234. Print.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 "Tech Baseball Reopens with Genial Joe Pittart." Technique 15 Jun 1946: p5. Print.
  6. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1945. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1945. p176. Print.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1947. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1947. p321,360-63. Print.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1958. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1958. p259,290-96. Print.
  9. Blue Print 1948
  10. 10.0 10.1 Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1949. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1949. p143,432-434. Print.
  11. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1950. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1950. p436-38. Print.
  12. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1951. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1951. p207-10. Print.
  13. 13.0 13.1 Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1953. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1953. p40,164,192-94. Print.
  14. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1954. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1954. p306, 337-39. Print.
  15. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1955. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1955. p327, 352-55. Print.
  16. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1956. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1956. p380-83. Print.
  17. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1957. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1957. p37, 70-74. Print.
  18. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1959. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1959. p414-19. Print.
  19. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1960. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1960. p390-96. Print.
  20. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1961. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1961. p63, 92-95. Print.
  21. Georgia Tech Student Publications. Blue Print, 1962. Georgia Institute of Technology, 1962. p272-73. Print.
  22. 22.0 22.1 22.2 22.3 "Coach Joe Pittard Dies at Age 73." Atlanta Journal-Constitution 05 Dec 1972, Print.
  23. "Funeral Notices." Atlanta Journal-Constitution 06 Dec 1972, Print.
  24. "Pittard Leads 'Hall' March." Atlanta Journal-Constitution 12 May 1968, Print.
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