Campus Recreation Center

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The Campus Recreation Center is located on 750 Ferst Drive on West Campus at the Georgia Institute of Technology and more precisely at UNIQ830130b4cce26a26-geo-00000000-QINU[1]. The Campus Recreation Center (also known as the CRC) offers a pool recognized around the world for its use in the olympics as well as other important swim meets, a high-tech fitness center, a leisure pool, an indoor track, and a rock climbing wall. [2] The CRC is also the home of Georgia Tech's division one Swimming and Diving team as well as many other intramural teams. Available at the CRC are yoga classes, martial arts classes, and aerobics classes, as well as the H2O Café that offers plenty of food to help recover after a hard workout, and much more. The Campus Recreation Center also includes the Stamps Fields, the Burger Bowl, the volleyball courts, and the leadership ropes course. [3]

Front of the CRC

Contents

History

The original recreation center was built in 1977, and was named the Student Athletic Center or SAC.[4] The current recreation center was reconstructed after Atlanta was chosen as the venue for the 1996 Summer Olympics. The construction for the pool was completed in August of 1994.[5] The Aquatic Center cost $16,800,000 to complete, and featured competitions in swimming, diving, water polo, synchronized swimming, and the swimming segment of the modern pentathlon competition. The competition pool is one of the fastest pools in the world because due to the design and construction of the competition pool, there is little wake to impede swimmers. It was one of the first pools in the world to use bromine instead of chlorine as its primary chemical. By using bromine, the pool does not hurt the skin and hair of frequent users, like chlorine does. Also, chlorine often damages swimmers' lungs while bromine does not. Bromine is liquid at room temperature and it does not evaporate into the air like chlorine. This quality coupled with the air ventilation system allows the pool to hold more people. At the time of its construction the pool stadium could hold about 15,000 people. The stadium seating once wrapped around both sides of the competition pool as well as the diving well[6]. However, currently the stadium seating is just on one side of the pool. Initially the pool was built with a roof, but without any main structural walls around it. The roof was mainly built to protect the spectators and swimmers from rain. Construction and renovation began in 2001 and ended in 2003. After the renovation the pool was enclosed by walls and only one side of the stadium seating remains. Since the seating was reduced the stadium can now only hold about 2,000 spectators[7]. Also added to the recreation center during the time of construction was the top floor which is the location of the multi-purpose courts and indoor tracks. The top floor is suspended on the pool and set a world record for the largest suspended concrete structure[8]. Interestingly enough the SAC fields were the largest single AstroTurf field at the time of it construction as well. Other additions were built, such as a recreation pool complete with a slide, lap lanes, a hot tub, and a lazy river. At this time the campus officially renamed the building from Student Athletic Center to the Campus Recreation Center.

The CRC pool used during the Olympics

Technology

The architects of the CRC placed high priority on the technological developments of the building. The roof of the CRC is covered with photovoltaic solar cells. These solar panels produce enough energy and electricity to supplement the entire Georgia Tech power grid, and also heat pool water which is pumped through pipes in the roof [9]. At the time the photovoltaic system was the largest in the world. It consisted of 2,856 modules and rated at 342 kW.[10]

Also, the competition swimming pool is configurable. The bulk heads that float on top the pool are moveable. This means that the pool can be converted to a 25 yard pool or to a 50 meter pool by simply moving the bulk heads. The pool also has a "false" bottom[11]. This means that the bottom of the pool can move up and down to adjust the depth of the pool. The depth of the pool is usually changed for various exercises by the swim team. For example, sprinters often raise the bottom so they can practice their flip turns at full speed without draining all of their energy by swimming the full length of the pool. It is used for a more fast pace and explosive training.

The fitness area is also very high tech. The fitness center houses 22 Life Fitness Signature Series,13 Hammer Strength Motion Technology Selectorized ,28 Hammer Strength Plate Loaded Machines (including Olympic Power Racks),5-130 lb. weights available, EZ curl and Olympic bars, 27 benches (including heavy weight, multi- adjustable, incline, decline, flat, arm curl, and military bench), 8 Dual adjustable pulley stations, and 4 Cable motion machines [12]. The CRC offers free wireless connection to its users. The plasma screen next to the turnstiles keeps members up to date on CRC events and campus happenings. A live webcam is located in the fitness center, giving members the chance to view the crowd before heading over. In addition, all of the Life Fitness Cardio Equipment include a LCD screen with an integrated television that offers more than 100 channels [13].

Recently the CRC bought two pink Cybex treadmills in honor of Breast Cancer awareness month this October. These treadmills will record the miles walked or ran and for every mile Cybex will donate ten cents to Breast Cancer research.[14]

Architects

During the time that Atlanta found out that the city was going to host the Olympics, the city searched for architects to design and build the facilities that would house the games.The Olympic Natatorium, now the Campus Recreation Center, was designed by Stanly Love-Stanley, PC, and Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart and Associates, Inc. Plans started in February of 1994. Interestingly enough the founder of the architecture firm, William J. Stanley III, was a Georgia Tech graduate. [15]He was actually the first African American graduate from the College of Architecture. Since he began his firm with his wife, Ivenue Love-Stanley, in 1977, he has won multiple awards, for example the Bernard Rothschild medal , which is Georgia’s highest award in architecture[16].

Statistics

Aquatic Center

Here are some interesting facts about the Campus Recreation Center:

  • 1.95 Million gallons of water in the Aquatic Center
  • 300,659 square feet
  • 25,000 lbs. of weights in the Fitness Center
  • 4,000 towels used per day
  • 3,800 maximum daily visits
  • 960 pieces of equipment rented in one semester from the Wilderness Outpost
  • 583 Intramural teams in one semester
  • 310 employees at the Campus Recreation Center
  • 209 pieces of fitness equipment

[17]

Back of the CRC

Awards

Here is a list of awards that the Campus Recreation Center has won:

  • "2006 Athletic Business Facilities of Merit Award
  • Green Lab recognition from R&D Magazine, November 2007 Lab of the Year issue
  • Best of Aquatics 2006 Best University/School
  • LEED Gold for Klaus Building, 2008
  • Winner of the 2005 Innovative Architecture & Design competition by Recreation Management
  • Outstanding Sports Facility for 2005 from the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association
  • Solar Decathlon 6th Place, 2007
  • Building Design & Construction Magazine's Gold Award Winner
  • Construction Management Association of America's 2005 Public Project less than $50,000,000 and Overall Winner
  • Design-Build Institute of America's National Award of Excellence
  • Princeton Review 2009 Green Initiatives Honor Roll at Colleges and Universities"

[18] [19]

View of the Volleyball Fields and SAC fields

References

  1. Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Georgia Tech. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://www.crc.gatech.edu/plugins/content/index.php?id=111
  2. Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Georgia Tech. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://www.crc.gatech.edu/plugins/content/index.php?id=111
  3. Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Georgia Tech. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://www.crc.gatech.edu/plugins/content/index.php?id=111
  4. Georgia Tech Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Academic dictionaries and encyclopedias. Retrieved December 6, 2010 from http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/2843427
  5. Georgia Tech Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Academic dictionaries and encyclopedias. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/2843427
  6. Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Georgia Tech. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://www.crc.gatech.edu/plugins/content/index.php?id=111
  7. Georgia Tech Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Academic dictionaries and encyclopedias. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/2843427
  8. Georgia Tech Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Academic dictionaries and encyclopedias. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/2843427
  9. Georgia Tech Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Academic dictionaries and encyclopedias. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/2843427
  10. Georgia Tech Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Academic dictionaries and encyclopedias. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/2843427
  11. Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Georgia Tech. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://www.crc.gatech.edu/plugins/content/index.php?id=111
  12. Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Georgia Tech. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://www.crc.gatech.edu/plugins/content/index.php?id=111
  13. Georgia Tech Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Academic dictionaries and encyclopedias. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/2843427
  14. Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Georgia Tech. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://www.crc.gatech.edu/plugins/content/index.php?id=111
  15. William J. Stanley, III. {26 Aug 2010}. In ACE. Retrieved October 21, 2010 from http://www.acementor.org/wsc_content/pics/user_upload/WillLoveTemplate.pdf
  16. William J. Stanley, III. {26 Aug 2010}. In ACE. Retrieved October 21, 2010 from http://www.acementor.org/wsc_content/pics/user_upload/WillLoveTemplate.pdf
  17. Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Georgia Tech. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://www.crc.gatech.edu/plugins/content/index.php?id=111
  18. Campus Recreation Center. {26 Aug 2010}. In Georgia Tech. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://www.crc.gatech.edu/plugins/content/index.php?id=111
  19. Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) 2008 Campus Sustainability Leadership Award Application. {26 Aug 2010}. In AASHE. Retrieved October 3, 2010 from http://www.aashe.org/resources/profiles/cat4_94.php
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